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Top 10 Flea Myths For Dogs & Cats

Top 10 Flea Myths For Dogs & Cats

MYTH #1: DO HEALTHY PETS GET FLEAS?

Pets can still get fleas even if they are healthy. It is important to keep a close eye on your pet and make sure that they do not have any ticks or fleas.

If you notice any ticks or fleas on your pet, you should take them to the vet. The vet will be able to give you the best treatment for your pets and make sure that they are healthy and happy.

MYTH #2: CAN FLEAS LIVE ON FURNITURE?

Fleas are tiny insects that live on animals and birds. They can also live on furniture. This is because they need a host to feed from, which is why they will find their way onto your couch, for example.

Fleas do not need to be alive in order to survive on furniture. They can lay eggs and stay dormant for months until they sense their host nearby again.

MYTH #3: CAN FLEAS LIVE IN A CLEAN HOUSE?

This is a question that many people ask themselves, and the answer is not as simple as it may seem. Fleas can live in a clean house, but they need to find their way into your home first.

Clean homes are not immune to fleas. The truth is that fleas have been living alongside humans for centuries. They feed on our blood and have no problem living in our homes.

MYTH #4: IS JUST ONE FLEA ON YOUR PET A BIG DEAL?

It may be hard to believe, but a single flea can lead to a whole host of problems for your pet. Fleas transmit diseases, such as tapeworms, and can also cause skin irritation.

With a steady supply of blood, female fleas can lay thousands of eggs within a few weeks. Those eggs hatch and the cycle continues. The result can be up to 20,000 new adult fleas within just two months!!

MYTH #5: IF I GET THE FLEAS OFF MY PET, IS THE PROBLEM SOLVED?

Once-a-month topical flea preventives can be an effective treatment for preventing the infestation of your pet. These products contain an IGR and sterilizing agent that kill the fleas.

The only drawback to this treatment is that it does not offer residual activity. Moreover, it is important to treat your home as well. If your pet has access to other houses with pets, the parasites will enter your home.

Medicated treatments for fleas are available. These are usually available as tablets or chewables and are usually prescribed by your veterinarian. These medicines target adult fleas and eggs.

They also have the ability to control ticks. Despite these disadvantages, these medications can be an excellent choice for flea control for your pet. One advantage of using these pills is that they start working immediately.

Many of these products have a 30 minute effect on your pet. However, keep in mind that the pills and powders are not designed to kill ticks.

In addition to applying a flea treatment to your pet, you should also clean your home to remove fleas.

Vacuuming is an excellent way to remove fleas, but it is not a permanent solution. Besides, frequent vacuuming will help keep the household clean.

Regularly cleaning your pet's bedding will keep your pets from catching fleas. You should also wash all bedding and blankets with hot water.

MYTH #6: I ONLY NEED TO TREAT MY ONE FLEA-RIDDEN PET, NOT THE OTHER PETS IN MY HOUSEHOLD.

It is important to remember that you cannot treat one pet for fleas and leave the other pets untreated. Fleas can jump from one pet to the other. This is why it is important to treat all pets in the household. 

MYTH #7: FLEA PRODUCTS ARE TOXIC

Are flea and tick control products safe for cats? The answer is no. The two most common ingredients in flea-and-tick solutions are permethrin and pyrethrins.

Read on to learn more about these ingredients, and how to use them safely on your cats. These two compounds are toxic to cats, but they are safe for dogs and humans. Fortunately, you can buy safer alternatives.

Some flea-control products are extremely toxic to cats. The most common way cats get poisoned is by putting dog-flea products on their pets.

Many people think that a small amount of the chemical is harmless since it isn't absorbed in a high enough concentration. Unfortunately, even the smallest amount of these pesticides can be deadly to cats. Here are some ways to protect your pets.

Often, the most common way cats become poisoned is by applying a dog flea product on their cats.

Most people think that because the dog flea product is higher in volume, it will not harm their cats, but this isn't true. Even a tiny amount of permethrin can cause an unwell cat. Toxic products for cats should never be used on a cat.

Most of the products used to treat fleas are highly toxic. The active ingredients in these products are pyrethrins, dichlorvos, and diazinon.

These are the most common and effective treatments for fleas and ticks. However, these chemicals can also be deadly to pets, and it is important to read the label. You must know the ingredient that's listed on the label, as well as the strength and type of product.

The chemical imidacloprid is a proven carcinogen. The chemical is also used in the prevention of ticks.

But the use of these products can be harmful to your cat. They can be fatal if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Therefore, it's essential to check the labels and follow instructions carefully to avoid adverse reactions.

Those products aren't safe for cats.

MYTH #8: DO FLEAS LIVE IN THE WINTER?

Although many people believe that fleas die off in the winter months, the truth is that fleas don't die off at all. They just move into a warm place to hibernate.

During the winter, they lay their eggs and await the spring. Then, they hatch and complete their life cycle in 14 days or less. During this time, they multiply rapidly and are not as noticeable as they are during warmer months.

Despite the colder weather, fleas still cause havoc during the colder months. Although fleas do not hibernate, they continue to produce eggs and larvae that eventually mature into adult fleas. In the winter months, your home provides an ideal environment for the fleas to reproduce.

Because they like warm, moist areas, fleas can survive even during the cold winter months.

MYTH #9: I’VE NEVER SEEN A FLEA ON MY PET, SO SHE DOESN’T NEED FLEA CONTROL.

Because fleas feed on blood, flea dirt is difficult to detect on dogs, but can be easily detected on cats. Using a special tool to identify flea dirt can help you identify the location of the problem.

The dirt may be dark or appear in clumps. It will usually appear on your dog's belly or rear. It is much more difficult to detect fleas in cats, as they are more meticulous groomers.

But if you notice a small amount of flea dirt on your dog, it doesn't necessarily mean your pet has fleas. So be sure to treat your pet immediately if you suspect an infestation. 

MYTH 10: PETS NEED FLEA PREVENTIVE ONLY A FEW MONTHS OUT OF THE YEAR

The duration of the flea season depends on where you live. According to the US Geological Survey, flea season generally starts in late summer and lasts into October.

However, they are a year-round problem, and you can find them all over your home. Depending on the season, fleas can be an issue for you all year round. In our area, the most common type of pest is the cat flea.

Once the female has bitten and sucks blood, she will start laying eggs within 48 hours and stay on the host animal for weeks.

The worst time to treat for fleas is early May and lasts through winter. September, October and November are the worst months for fleas.

Once you've treated the whole house, you can begin tapering off treatment and prevent further infestation. If you're worried about ticks, you can try applying a topical insecticide during these times. In addition, it's recommended to apply a preventive medicine once the temperature is consistently below freezing.

If you're in the Midwest, the flea season starts earlier and lasts through the winter. However, the worst months for fleas are May, October, and November.

By then, temperatures in these states are consistently below freezing. By the end of the season, you can stop treating your pet or home for fleas.

If you're in a warm-weather state, you need to protect yourself against fleas and ticks all year long.

 

Read more: Surviving Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

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